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In 1935, Sir Philip Mitchell arrived in Uganda as governor after serving in Tanganjika for the past sixteen years. He was convinced that the relationship between Uganda and the protective power should have a different character than that of the local authorities and the Tanganjika government. [9] Recognizing that the early protectorate had produced a pattern of growing distrust and clandestine change, Mitchell devised a plan to reform and restructure the system between the protectorate government and the Buganda government. [10] In asserting that the relationship between the protectorate government and the government of Buganda`s mother was that of protected and non-indirect domination, he planned to replace the post of provincial commissioner of Buganda with a resident and to remove district officials from the centre, provided that Kabaka was required to follow the advice of the resident and his collaborators. [9] However, under the Ugandan Convention of 1900, Kabaka was only required to respond to such advice in the case of the implementation of the Lukiiko resolutions. Relations between Kabaka, the protectorate government and its ministers deteriorated and, due to the limited power of the governor under the 1900 agreement to impose its council on Kabaka, the reorganization led to a steady decline in the influence that the protectorate government could exert in Buganda. [9] At the request of Sir Gerald Portal, Alfred Tucker, Bishop of East Africa and later Bishop of Uganda, asked the British authorities to take control of Uganda. [2] On 29 May 1893, a contract between Portal and Kabaka Mwanga secured Uganda as a British protectorate. On August 27, 1894, Mwanga was forced to sign another contract with Colonel H.E. Colvile, who favoured the conventional acquisition of the territory.

[3] Although the treaties of 1893 and 1894 were concluded because Uganda, as defined by the Berlin Conference, stumbled upon the British sphere of influence, Britain did not have the sanctity of traditional leaders and their peoples. It was important that an agreement be reached, contrary to a treaty, so that British domination would become de jure and not de facto. [3] In establishing Uganda`s northern border as the Kafu River, the 1894 Colvile Agreement formalized the promise that Uganda would obtain certain areas in exchange for their support against Bunyoro. [1] Two of the “lost counties” (Buyaga and Bugangaizi) were returned to Bunyoro after the referendum on lost counties in Uganda in 1964. [7] The Uganda Herald newspaper of 14 August 1914 reproduced the oath: “I Daudi Chwa, I swear that I will serve our sovereign lord King George V well and truly in Kabaka`s office in Buganda and I will be right according to the law and the use of the protectorate of Uganda, without fear or favor, affection of goodwill. This is how God helps me. The British wanted not only to be the masters of the kingdom and its people, but also to have a say in the next Kabaka. After the death of Kabaka, his successor was elected by a majority of votes in the Lukiiko Council or the Original Council. The name of the person elected by the Council of Mothers must be submitted for approval by Her Majesty`s Government and no person may be recognized as Kabaka by Uganda whose election has not received the approval of Her Majesty`s Government,” Article 6 continues. Prior to the signing of the agreement, The Kabaka of Buganda chose its officials without consultation. Made in English and Luganda in Mengo, Kingdom of Uganda, March 10, 1900.